LAX hates me

Perhaps Los Angeles International “airport” knows that I write bad things about it.  Perhaps LAX (its Airport code) can manipulate the universe and dish out retribution.

As mentioned in the previous entry (which I was writing while still at LAX), I was connecting through Los Angeles to get to Seattle.

I made it to Seattle.  My suitcase did not.  This is the SECOND TIME IN A ROW that my luggage has not made it on the connection from Los Angeles to Seattle.

It’s an incredibly frustrating feeling to realize one’s suitcase has been lost.  To make matters worse, Alaska Airlines didn’t send out our luggage until an hour after the plane had already landed.  Picture a hundred passengers milling about the baggage claim, staring at the carousel waiting for the luggage to come.  Note that the flight landed at 10:30 at night so people were tired and harried.

Finally the baggage comes (people had already started complaining, one lady grabbed all the complaint forms she could see and dispensed them to the passengers, encouraging us that we should all write in a separate complaint to encourage Alaska Airlines to change).

People pick up their bags and leave.  A few passengers and I are left standing there looking at the 3 bags remaining on the carousel.  None of them are ours.  AARGH.

Walk over to the service desk, they tell me that *maybe* the luggage will be on the next flight from Los Angeles and that if I wanted to I could wait.  They gave me a whopping 6 dollar voucher so that I could have a coffee before the luggage came.

I waited.  Repeated the carousel process, still no luggage.  Boo-hoo for me.  I filed the claim and headed to the hotel at 1+ in the morning, feeling exhausted, weary, and frustrated after a 24+ hour journey from Singapore.

Welcome to the USA!

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One response to this post.

  1. Do you think the poor level of US carriers is directly linked to the amount you pay for your air tix?

    I understand that the average US consumer likes things cheap and that might add adverse pressure on staff quality, training and service.

    Reply

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